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slonkak
04-11-2008, 02:02 AM
So I just now noticed that on Dr. Kiki's lab coat, it says
Dr. Kiki Sanford, Ph.D.
I know I'm just nitpicking, but I find that kind of redundant. Either you're Dr. Kiki Sanford, or you're Kiki Sanford, Ph.D. Having both is kind of redundant, especially since a Doctor of Philosophy is the generic doctoral degree. Maybe having both would make sense if it was an M.D. or something like that. I don't know, I just wanted to spark some conversation on this.

tokenuser
04-11-2008, 02:44 AM
So I just now noticed that on Dr. Kiki's lab coat, it says

I know I'm just nitpicking, but I find that kind of redundant. Either you're Dr. Kiki Sanford, or you're Kiki Sanford, Ph.D. Having both is kind of redundant, especially since a Doctor of Philosophy is the generic doctoral degree. Maybe having both would make sense if it was an M.D. or something like that. I don't know, I just wanted to spark some conversation on this.My wife only uses "Dr." if she is booking into hotels or onto airplanes, but her student all refer to her as Doctor or Professor (which I find odd - we were always on a first name basis with our profs in Australia). I don't think I have ever seen her use PhD.

My understadning in the Biomed word is that putting PhD or MD is not uncommon - as a means of differentiating your areas. I guess you could take it even further with DDS (dental), DVM (vet), LD or LLD (Doctor of Letters - Lawyer), etc. Yes - they are all doctors, but the extra letters indicate what kind of doctor they are.

kcchan
04-11-2008, 03:57 AM
Well doesn't she have like three Ph.D's? I think she deserves the double title just to prove that she's smarter than all of us combined.

modmac
04-11-2008, 10:49 AM
If you earned it show it the hell off!

slonkak
04-11-2008, 03:06 PM
All good points. My personal feeling is that unless you're a medical doctor of some sort, you shouldn't get the Dr. prefix. If I got a doctorate in comp. sci. I would be Kevin Slonka, Ph.D. not Dr. Slonka. To me, that's how most people differentiate real doctors from academic "doctors." When I hear the word "doctor" I think of someone who can fix me when I'm sick.

darknessgp
04-11-2008, 03:17 PM
All good points. My personal feeling is that unless you're a medical doctor of some sort, you shouldn't get the Dr. prefix. If I got a doctorate in comp. sci. I would be Kevin Slonka, Ph.D. not Dr. Slonka. To me, that's how most people differentiate real doctors from academic "doctors." When I hear the word "doctor" I think of someone who can fix me when I'm sick.

But they are the same. If you get a doctorate in comp sci why do you claim that is different than having a doctorate in another field (i.e. Medic)?

tokenuser
04-11-2008, 03:18 PM
All good points. My personal feeling is that unless you're a medical doctor of some sort, you shouldn't get the Dr. prefix. If I got a doctorate in comp. sci. I would be Kevin Slonka, Ph.D. not Dr. Slonka. To me, that's how most people differentiate real doctors from academic "doctors." When I hear the word "doctor" I think of someone who can fix me when I'm sick.Thats true, except in an Academic environment when Doctor is used as a title to indicate that you have some form of doctoral degree, and are not an instructor or other ancilliary staff. My wife looks young, and unless she actively introduces herself as "Doctor" or "Professor" (which doesn't necessarily imply that you have a doctoral degree) other academics assume she is a student. Considering she has won awards for her research, it is a title she has earnt - but not one she uses outside an academic setting (except for airplane tickets and hotel rooms).

I have to say though that my wife does not own a lab coat :)

masherscf
04-11-2008, 03:34 PM
It is redundant. You shouldn't use both. But, I think they're just trying to be funny.

If I had a labcoat it would read "Professor Goldings, Ph.D."


Using the title "Professor" is a little sketchy. "Professor" is a title of respect to the person teaching a college level class. This is like calling your martial arts instructor "sensei" or the skipper of the boat "Captain." That is, you can be called "Captain" and not actually have the rank of Captain in the Navy. You can be called "professor" in an academic setting and not have the actual rank.

However, in a non-academic setting, it is not proper to refer to someone as "Professor" if they don't actually hold that academic rank. You would not be addressed in a court of law as "Professor" just because you are a college instructor. On the other hand, I can be addressed as both "Doctor" and "Professor" in a court of law.

I'll usually introduce myself as "Doctor" unless I'm in a medical setting where that would be confusing. However, I sign my letters as "Ph.D."

BTW, professor ranks are available exclusively to those with Doctoral degrees or MFA degrees in disciplines that don't award doctoral degrees. Therefore, in an academic standing a "Doctor" trumps a "professor", while in a non-academic setting a "Professor" trumps a "Doctor."

One of the other cool things about having a Ph.D. is that I can use myself as a reference when people start arguing about my academic discipline. Unfortunately, good Mathematics arguments are few and far between.

slonkak
04-11-2008, 04:16 PM
I have to say though that my wife does not own a lab coat :)

Yet... You should definitely buy her a labcoat. Dr. Professor TokenUser's Wife, Ph.D. :p

slonkak
04-11-2008, 04:18 PM
Unfortunately, good Mathematics arguments are few and far between.

2+2=5

masherscf
04-11-2008, 05:36 PM
2+2=5

Said, I sad "Good Arguments." I'm talking really religious stuff like "The shortest distance between two points is not a straight line and two parallel lines actually meet.

mrpopular
04-11-2008, 05:41 PM
I thinking i'm going to start booking my flights & hotels as Dr.____ ___

masherscf
04-11-2008, 05:49 PM
I thinking i'm going to start booking my flights & hotels as Dr.____ ___

You should. I also insist that telemarketers address me as Doctor.

darknessgp
04-12-2008, 06:11 AM
... I'm talking really religious stuff like "The shortest distance between two points is not a straight line ...

That's not religious. It's fact, that the shortest distance between two points is nothing. Take a piece of paper, draw two points on opposite ends of the paper, then fold the paper... You are folding a 2D object into/through the next upper dimension, the tricky part is folding a 3D object using the 4th dimension.

bani-banan
04-24-2008, 08:53 PM
I thinking i'm going to start booking my flights & hotels as Dr.____ ___

I tried doing that. Unfortunately they do check IDs here.

back when Mr & Mrs Smith (the movie) was released, my parents used "mr and mrs smith" to book hotel rooms. Why, you say? Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie used that to book their rooms, and they were on a world tour promoting their movie.

At least they got a laught out of it=)