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Old 10-20-2010, 03:45 AM
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Default Electric crock pot vs non electric ?

I'm shopping for a crock pot. I want to know what the benefits of electric vs non electric are. Also if any of you have any suggestions for a particular brand I'd appreciate it. My price range is up to $200
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Old 10-20-2010, 04:54 AM
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Originally Posted by trunolimit View Post
I'm shopping for a crock pot. I want to know what the benefits of electric vs non electric are.
It works without gas?
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Old 10-20-2010, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by tehboris View Post
It works without gas?
That's it?

I read somewhere that in electric cookers the food cooks uneven because the heat source is on the bottom. Non electric cookers have the advantage of even heat distribution. Is this true?

So far I am leaning towards electric because in non electric I have to bring the food up to a certain temperature than seal it and that just seems like an extra step. The whole point of me getting one is because I am a lazy fat ass who needs to eat healthier.
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Old 10-21-2010, 10:57 PM
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I much prefer to use a cast iron dutch oven in my oven over a crock pot. Perfect heat distribution and no low, medium, high settings that can mean anything. Plus it can be used on the stove, in the oven, or even on a grill. They are also better for when you want to deep fry foods.

Oh and watch out for crock pot recipes. They tend to be written by southern cooks who have no problem WAY over-cooking meat.
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Old 10-22-2010, 12:46 AM
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I like a casserole dish in the oven, but a crockpot is good too. Electric is fine.
The thing about a crockpot is that you are heating the food low and slow - and generally in a liquid. Provided you have a decent crockpot (something like this), the inner vessel will distribute and radiate the heat over the food relatively evenly. Yes, it might be warmer near the element, but 50 years of crockpot recipes have pretty much eliminated that.

Just dont skimp on the crockpot. Most have a High, Low, and Hold function on them. You cook at Low if its going on as you leave for work, it goes on high if you are putting it on after lunch for dinner, and it goes on hold/warm when you get home until you are ready to eat. Newer ones have digital controls that will et you cook on a timer at different heat settings - nice, but not necessarily needed.

It's not rocket science, but I'd recommend you get a crockpot cookbook - not going to recommend any in particular, just get one with recipes you think you might like.
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Old 10-22-2010, 06:42 PM
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If you are afraid of uneven cooking, you can stir the food every hour or so. We usually just leave ours on the low setting, so it will take 10 hours to cook -- long and slow, to really break up the tougher cuts of meat.
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Old 10-22-2010, 06:50 PM
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I would only use the crock-pot on low. However, I prefer the dutch oven when that is feasible.
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