MAME Part 3: Mounting the TV, Buttons, Trackball, Coin Door and Speakers!

Buttons! Trackball! TV! Coin Door! Speakers! Our arcade sized MAME case is on track. We've got template help for the buttons... and tips on not getting shocked by the TV!

Buttons! Trackball! TV! Coin Door! Speakers!

The biggest change from our last episode was mounting the TV in our MAME case. You don''t have to take the TV out of the case, but David was looking for a more traditional feel for our cabinet.

So, in case you follow our example, we'll show you which part of the TV tube you'd better not touch!

Buttons took more time... we'd already built the mount for our TV. The buttons required a template and a lot of time drilling holes with a spade bit.

The template saved us a lot of time measuring... David mocked it up in Visio, printed it out and taped it to the deck. Next: he drilled right thru it with the appropriate sized bit. (We'll show you how he got the trackball installed on the show, too!)

Yes, you can have a copy of the button template David drew up.

And if you're wondering where David got the pushbuttons, joysticks, trackball, and coin door check out his fave source for arcade parts: HAPP.

Finally... the speakers and coin door. Patrick made a template for the speakers (we're recycling a computer speaker set) by taking a rubbing off one of the speakers, doing some measuring, and grabbing the case of hole saws, drilling holes, and gluing the speakers in place w/ a mess of silicone caulk. (Your standard household variety worked just fine.)

On a happy note, this is the last of the woodworking for the MAME arcade machine... next up, wiring the buttons, getting the MAME machine configured. Our resident UNIX maven, Brendan, is back to help us with that.

Want to play along at home? David has put together a PDF file with a drawing of our case, along with all the dimensions, tools and supplies!

We did the basic woodworking in Systm Episode 24.

In Systm Episode 25 we talked about the finer points of cutting vent holes, plastic wood (for filling in holes and cracks) and sanding. Lots and lots of sanding.